The Lonely Haciendas of Mexico : Which Way 2015, Week 35

                                                  The Lonely Haciendas of Mexico

Although not obvious to the unschooled eye, the haciendas of Mexico are everywhere in my part of Jalisco.  Some are retained by the children of former owners who live in Guadalajara or farther away.  The descendants of families who have tended these haciendas for hundreds of years  still reside there with no money for maintenance and owners who forget their pay for months or even years at a time.  This, although sad for them, is fortunate for those of us who wish to witness the ruins of times gone by, for a few hundred pesos is a godsend to them and wins us admittance to see these aging ghosts.

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IMG_0316IMG_0369IMG_0210 IMG_0305 IMG_0150 IMG_0199 IMG_0109 IMG_0116 IMG_0126 IMG_0160 IMG_0220 IMG_0216 (1) One of the haciendas depicted was purchased by a Canadian couple who donated it as a boy’s orphanage.  Another is a former horse-raising hacienda with all its original furniture, drapes, tackle and games room, complete with a horse racing game.  The hacienda in better repair was purchased by a Spanish company and is now a hotel.
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All of these haciendas are within an hour’s drive from my home in San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, Mexico. Just one of the eight or so I’ve visited is still being used by the family to raise horses.  Formerly it contained a sugar refinery and the tall tower still remains.

I’ve chosen to abide by the theme “Which Way” and to show windows, doors and pathways.  Perhaps in the future I’ll show some of the interiors.

For more every which ways, go here: http://ceenphotography.com/2015/09/02/cees-which-way-challenge-2015-week-35/

19 thoughts on “The Lonely Haciendas of Mexico : Which Way 2015, Week 35

    1. lifelessons Post author

      One is on the back road ( through Joco) to Guad…a road that leads off the carretera before Los Trojes. You can find it by looking for the rows of palm trees on either side of the road.It is now a boy’s orphanage. Another is a turnoff to the left somewhere around the turnoff for the town where the Tres Reyes festival is. Is it Lake Cajititlan? I’ve gotten so bad at remembering names. Another is in the sugar refining town you get to off the back (Joco) road to Guad. I think you stay on the road a bit after the turnoff to Guad and then turn left..Can’t remember its name either! The person who knows all of the haciendas is Jill Fessenden. She takes photography tours to them now, I think. I think one of the haciendas I’ve visited but that isn’t in these pictures is in Santa Cruz. The chapel of that house has become their city church and the buildings that surround it have now been condominiumized, I believe. We saw it with my friend Chuy (unfortunately now desceased) before that happened.I have the name of the orphanage but can’t look it up without losing this message, so will post again. Sorry my memory is so feeble. The horse breeding/racing hacienda was/is the most interesting of all. It has murals inside, a wall outside that looks like it was a firing wall–bullet holes all over it…and the contents are intact. That picture of the decaying curtain was taken there.

      Ah just remembered another is in San Francisco on the other side of the lake. The family still lives in it and breeds horses. Right up your alley.

      Huejotitlan is the name of the hacienda near Los Trojes that is now an orphanage.

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      1. Peggy Langdon

        I’ve been to Huejotitlan and it is fascinating..had a Christmas dinner there. We have one here in Cedros but I can’t seem to find out very much information on it..When we moved out here we were told we could buy it for $1,000,000. USD. Nope..but think this was all tequila plants out here years ago. Go through Santa Cruz almost every Tuesday. Will have to look around next week.San Juan Evangelista is near here also. Where is the horse breeding one? That would be worth a road trip!! Thanks for the info and reply…we still have a lunch to complete one of these days…

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      2. lifelessons Post author

        So let’s schedule it. I’m free Tues. (the 8th) and Fri of next week. M, T, W, F of the week after that. If none of those dates are good for you, make a suggestion. Let’s do it!!

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      I have dug into my photo disks saved from old computers. No telling what I will find. I can’t understand people who say photography takes away from the experience. For me, it makes the experience! Don’t think you would argue with that. My very favorite was the window with tattered drapes. I saved that from a nearly black photo…Yay for photo editing programs.

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      Thanks Animar. I didn’t make it clear that I have lived in Mexico for the past 14 years! Thanks for reblogging. I’m honored that you enjoyed the pictures and the tale.

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  1. Miss Quoted

    Reblogged this on Untold Stories and commented:
    This is a repost of a repost. I could not look at these pictures without wondering about the stories that go along with them. Why did these families leave? What is it that makes us let a beautiful old home go to ruin? Enjoy.

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      The children become educated and go to bigger cities to work. Then when the parents die, the children and their children get involved in their lives in the city and come back less and less. There is a big interest in Spain in restoring and refurbishing these Mexican haciendas for Spanish tourists to visit.

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      1. Miss Quoted

        Thank you for telling the story! I think it’s sad that we spend so much time worrying about our futures that we forget that we have a past worth learning about and sharing with others. I’m glad they are looking into restoration for future generations to appreciate.

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  2. Pingback: Which Way Challenge-15-Wk-35 | WoollyMuses

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