Category Archives: Gardens

Lucky: The Pleasures of Advancing Age

 

(Click on photos to enlarge.)

Lucky
(The Pleasures of Advancing Age)

If I were a golfer, I fear there’d be no putting,
for my grass is lush and verdant— badly in need of  cutting.
Meanwhile, the bougainvillea has gotten out of hand.
It’s like a barbed wire jungle—every twisted strand.
If I were more rambunctious, I’d grab work gloves and scramble
to gas up the mower and to tackle every  bramble,
but those days of industrious gardening are far back in my past.
Those Olympian feats of plant and tend simply didn’t last.
Instead I lie here in my bed growing and trimming words.
Outside, through the curtains, I hear the wakening birds.
I hear the front gate opening, make out the squeak of wheels.
Is there a single reader who detects how good it feels
to just fluff up the pillows and type on throughout the dawn
as Pasiano trims the thorny vines and mows the blasted lawn?

Prompt words today are verdant, meanwhile, rambunctious and lucky. Here are links:
https://ragtagcommunity.wordpress.com/2019/05/13/rdp-monday-verdant/
https://fivedotoh.com/2019/05/13/fowc-with-fandango-meanwhile/
https://onedailyprompt.wordpress.com/2019/05/13/your-daily-word-prompt-rambunctious-may-13-2019/
https://wordofthedaychallenge.wordpress.com/2019/05/13/lucky/

Thunbergia and Bougainvillea: FOTD Apr 4, 2019

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The thunbergia seem to be advancing on the back yard. If the bougainvillea can’t defend themselves, then so be it.  I love the lushness and the contrast between the two.

 

For Cee’s FOTD.

Creeping Charlie and Chinese Garlic Chives


They shoulder out my succulents and commandeer my grass.

Perky little coins of green, they have a lot of brass.
Chinese garlic lifts white heads a bit above the fray.
Although they’re uninvited guests, I guess they’re here to stay.

For Cee’s Flower of the Day

Pre-Flower Garden Collage: Flower of the Day, Sep 3, 2018

IMG_2037When this new little hibiscus blooms, it will hopefully add some color to this area of the garden.  You can barely see it’s spindly little limb sticking up above the citronella, succulents and new bushy red plant. The cactus spine was one we collected in AZ to make a lamp out of before Bob died.  It has found a new purpose in this arrangement. The terra cotta cone is the top of a clay sculpture the animals knocked over and broke, now repurposed .

A Summer Garden

The garden isn’t at its best during the dry season, but I’ve had a request to photograph it, so here it is, with all of its warts. With the exception of the sculpture of the seated woman from the front patio, this is all the back garden. The front garden is a bit of a mess due to all of the debris from the roof repairs. I’ll show it in a later post. The dome of the roof is here pictured as a pale gray as it is currently being repaired but will eventually be restored to its rose color. Please click on first photo to enlarge all and view as a slide series.

For Cee’s Flower post.

 

Garden Layers: May 11, Flower of the Day

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Plumeria, papyrus, cactus, bougainvillia, yucca and palm form the layers in this garden collage. I need to go our and see how much remains after the colossal storm last night.

Do not miss Cee’s iris bud after rain today.  Here it is.

A Walk through a Winter Solstice Garden: Flower of the Day, Dec 21, 2017

Went for a short walk through my back yard today.  This is what I saw: (On Facebook, click on URL to see all flowers. Click on first photo to enlarge all.)

 

 For Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge.

Hurricanes and Volcanos: Videos of a Subtropical Garden

 

The combined effect of living above an inland lake surrounded by mountains and being 40 miles from Colima Volcano—one of the most active volcanoes in North America—makes for interesting weather during hurricane season. No wind, but our usually sunny mornings turn overcast and misty.  The air is a bit cooler than usual, and when the volcanically-heated mineral springs empty into my pool and hot tub, it makes for some very atmospheric scenes.  Pasiano was in the process of clipping and cleaning up, getting ready for the lush growth of the rainy season.  Morrie, as usual, made his mark on the occasion. Who could have staged that?  Who would want to?  Hope you enjoy these scenes of my terrace, pool and garden.

 

Gardener, Know Thy Garden. Gatherer, Know Thy Garnishings.

image and film from internet

Gardener, Know Thy Garden. Gatherer, Know Thy Garnishings


That bloom upon your table, trees in your “empty” lot

might feature in a bloody murder mystery’s plot.
Its fruit looks so inviting. Its seeds you gather with care,
just as an adornment, but there’s more than beauty there.

One drop can bring your ending. One fruit can cause great pain.

One time unknowingly eaten, you’ll never taste again.
Be careful what you gather and use care in your adorning.
What’s beautiful and delicious can kill without a warning!

 

(I’m adding this to Cee’s daily flower posting as I think it is important for us all to know that what is pleasing to the eye and palate is not always as innocent as it appears to be.)

Below  are all photos of deadly plants and seeds that I’ve taken that are in my own garden, my jewelry box, or the gardens of friends.  Who knew? I could go on with photos of lantana, lilies, oleander, but I’ve just been informed my startup disk is full again, so I’ll leave it to you to get to know your own garden. I’ve gotten rid of all the lantana because for some reason my dogs love eating it.  Also my lilies, as some varieties can kill a cat who brushes up against them and then licks its coat.

 

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Datura from beside my friend Harriet’s door. jdbphoto

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My “empty” lot next door is filled with these deadly tree-sized castor bean plants.  jdbphoto 

IMG_5369Castor beans going to seed jdbphoto

IMG_5371 (1)Castor bean flowers jdbphoto

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I’ve seen young girls in Bali drilling these seeds to string as jewelry.  One slip of the drill could bring about their end.  These earrings were purchased in Mexico.  I’ve purchased others in Peru.  Widely used for ornamentation, they are deadly poison. jdbphoto