Monthly Archives: March 2016

Refresh Me

DSC09348

Refresh Me

If you hope to make conjunction
with me at your little function,
serve potato chips with dip
and also, I’d appreciate a sip
of Diet Coke or Seven Up
in a waxy paper cup.

No one likes a fete that lacks
sweet or salty little snacks.
Pizza, nachos and popcorn, too,
are appropriate things to chew.
Leave caviar to lords and kings.
I’d much rather have onion rings.

Refreshments are an absolute must.
Without them, parties are a bust.
And any date becomes an upper
when it includes a little supper.
So if you wish to win my heart,
my stomach is the place to start.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/refresh/

Composed Shapes

Cee’s challenge for this week is Geometry in Photography.  Here are my thoughts on the matter:

Click on photos to enlarge and read the extensive commentary under each photo.  Oh c’mon–do it.  I took a lot of time and effort to dissect these photos as Cee requested. If you read my comments, you can point out what I missed in your own comment below! (If you can’t read the commentary under each photo, I’ve copied the commentaries below.)

 

Here is the commentary for photos if you can’t read it above:

  1. I pulled off the road in heavy traffic to get this shot. I loved the soft shape of the clouds sliced through by the telephone lines. The triangular shapes of the sign, the intersection of the lines and the wooden crossbars, the insulators and the top of the Norfolk Island pine are in contrast to the square shapes of the building in the background.
  2. I love this detail cropped from a larger view of my friend Carol’s studio. The round end of the paper towel roll ties in colorwise with the square/rectangular blank canvasses and the jumble of paintbrushes furnish triangular Vee shapes. The straight sides of the bottles contrast with the rumpled “O’ shapes of the inside-out rubber gloves. Order juxtapositioned with disorder makes for an artistic whole.
  1. These straw hats stored on-edge behind the grillwork of Carol’s house are one of my favorite images. The round shapes of the hats and curliques, the rectangular divisions on the grilll and the zigzag/triangular weave of the hats create busy detail in what is otherwise a simple scene.
  1. Round balloons, square box, plaid blouse, the triangle of the girl’s legs and sidewalk edge, long rectangles of the tree trunks, round wheels, zigzag of the stacked chairs. Shapes abound in this picture made more intriguing by the revealing details of the girl’s attire and stance.
  1. The triangles of their perky ears and pointed noses accented by the shadowed patterns and the trapezoid shape of the exercise machine in the background, the circular screws and platform on the machine echoed by the round studs on the collar of the dog, the commanding stance of the white dog with the black dog in a near bowing position––all intriguing details in this shot.
  1. Mexican Train offers an excellent opportunity to play with shapes. The round shape of the “station” is echoed by dots on the dominoes. The train tracks formed by the rectangular dominoes form semi-straight lines–all in all, a collage of rectangles and circles.
  1. I hesitated to include this shot of a Pemex station, but couldn’t resist the repeated patterns and shapes–squares, rectangles, T shapes––and the one round manhole cover. I also love the positions of the attendants next to the gas pumps at the rear of the photo. The clouds are the only soft thing in the photo.

To see Cee’s Geometric Photos, go HERE.

“Hugh’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Week 19 – “Gap”

“Gap-toothed she was and sure to please!”  (One of my favorite lines from The Canterbury Tales! He is describing the bawdy wife of Bath.)

(Click on photos to enlarge and read captions.)

http://hughsviewsandnews.com/2016/03/29/hughs-weekly-photography-challenge-week-19-gap/

Voice

The one word prompt today was “Voice.”  “Gray Walls with Boxes”  is a rewrite of a poem I wrote four years ago.  In it I attempt to act as the voice of my sister Betty who is in advanced stages of Alzheimer’s.  Everything in the poem is an attempt to see the world as she was then seeing it, as evidenced by what she said to me and I recorded either in notes or with a voice recorder during our visits.

I often wonder whether those suffering from dementia are actually in a different world of their own making that is pleasant to them.  I think my sister now is, but four years ago––at the stage I describe in this poem––she was often in distress, confusing the interrelationship of people, objects, paintings on the wall, the television and what was going on around her.  To her, all seemed to be part of the same reality.

Gray Walls with Boxes

Once I knew words that fit together.
Now my mind still has the answers,
but rarely lets me in to find them.

People who seem to know me
bring pizza in a box
and we eat it in front of another box I’ve forgotten the name for––
a small world with other people moving in it that I don’t know.
Sometimes words appear in a ribbon on the bottom edge of that box
and I wonder if I understood them
if they ‘d tell me what I’m supposed to do.

On the walls are other flat boxes
with people frozen in them
and I think it is my fault.
There is something I am supposed to be doing.
There is something I am supposed to be doing.
“They are your pictures, Mother.
They’re there for decoration—
for you to enjoy,”
a woman tells me
when I ask her
if she’d like to take them
home with her.

I don’t belong here.
My high school boyfriend
must be wondering
where I’ve gone
and my daughter is as confused as I am,
claiming to be her own child;
and then one day my sister comes
and I have to laugh because they all
look so much alike—
my sister and her niece and her niece’s daughter
whom they try to convince me
are my daughter and my granddaughter––
so many layers of daughters
that it is too hard to keep them
all in mind.

But then that floats away
and I am trying to remember
when I am leaving this hotel
and I feel I’m not suited to run for president
although all those people
cheering at that big convention in that little box
want me to––
that little box they turn off and on each day,
sometimes before or after I’m ready
to have it turned off.

And they take me to that large room
where all those silent older people sit.
I do not want to go into this room,
but I am lucky, and we move through it.
Someone’s daughters have come to put me
into a box that moves us through the world
without walking. At first, I am so surprised by it,
then I remember what it is
but can’t remember the word for it.
As we sit in it, the world moves by
too fast, scaring me, and I try
to weep unnoticed.

But then they take me out of it,
give me popcorn
and lead me into a very large room
with many people sitting down
and an entire wall with larger people
moving on it, and it is so confusing, like déjá vu,
for I remember being in a room like this before,
but I don’t know if I’m supposed to
make them do something other
than what they are doing
or if I’m already controlling them with my thoughts
or if I’m supposed to be
up there on the wall with them.
I can’t remember whether these people
on either side of me are my sisters
or my children or strangers,
sitting chair after chair down the long aisle.

Most days, I am so sad all day long,
but sometimes my real self
comes to visit and I think,
how did I become a martyr like my grandmother
and why can’t I stop myself from crying, just like her?
One gray wall meets another at the corner
and I’m sure
that I am being punished
for things I did but can’t remember.

That blank face
in the mirror
has me in it,
but I can’t get out
and for a moment I know, then forget
that this is why I cry
and even though it tries to comfort me,
I cannot stop.

 

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/voice/