Not a Clue

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Not a Clue

“Jejune” is a word that I bet you don’t know.
It simply means tedious, dreary or slow.
Guileless or boring, simple or naive—
artless and unworldly with naught up your sleeve.

When it comes to semantics, jejune folks won’t quibble.
They do not distinguish between drip or dribble.
When they need a haircut, please tell them they’re hairy.
Calling them “hirsute” will just make them wary.

If  big words should reach the apex of your tongue,

consider taking it down just a rung.
Jejune folks like small words like “pretty” and “cute.”
Words like “alluring” will render them mute.

Words like “obstreperous” also won’t do.
If you use a big word, they won’t have a clue.
Don’t call it a “wen” when it’s merely a pimple.
Things are much clearer when words are left simple.

 

 

Chritsine issued me a further challenge after she read their poem, so I wrote another. You can fine a link to her challenge and also my poem–short and silly– HERE.

https://ragtagcommunity.wordpress.com/2019/05/08/rp-wednesday-grateful/
https://fivedotoh.com/2019/05/08/fowc-with-fandango-semantics/
https://onedailyprompt.wordpress.com/2019/05/08/your-daily-word-prompt-jejune-may-8-2019/
https://wordofthedaychallenge.wordpress.com/2019/05/08/apex/

11 thoughts on “Not a Clue

  1. Christine Goodnough

    Very well done! You’ve inspired me to think of big words again, especially as I kept seeing them in the “Amelia Butterworth” novel I just read. Amelia often refers — in a somewhat overweening manner, I think — to her perspicacity in general, and her ability to prognosticate the actions of the culpable party.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    1. lifelessons Post author

      Yikes!!! Stop!! Stop!!! I must admit there are a few words I like showing off with…just to prove I know the meaning. But they are few and far between, so hope I can be forgiven for them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Daisy Declines Deficit – Christine's Collection

  3. Pingback: Jackman and Jillian | lifelessons – a blog by Judy Dykstra-Brown

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