Calendula officinalis (Pot Marigolds) Flower of the Day, Oct. 9, 2016

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Mums or Marigolds? anglogermantranslations says they are marigolds.  I couldn’t decide which they were, so labelled them as mums.  What do you think?  I’m always willing to alter a misconception.  At any rate, when I think of October, I think of Homecoming corsages and that means mums, so in the spirit of autumn, I will dedicate this photo to chrysanthemums even if it is marigolds. After many votes either way, I received a comment from variegatus so scientific and thorough that I am changing the title of this post to Marigold.  Definitely marigold.  See that information below in the comments section, and if you want to view other flowers as well, see Cee’s and other flowers HERE.

15 thoughts on “Calendula officinalis (Pot Marigolds) Flower of the Day, Oct. 9, 2016

    1. lifelessons Post author

      Trying to decide between mums and marigolds, they looked more like mums to me. I found a photo that looked exactly like them when I Googled mums, but it often happens that they slip in an incorrect photo… sometimes waaaay incorrect. Are you sure they are marigolds? If so, I’ll “translate” my label to marigold….I often rely on readers to edit my decisions on flower names.

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  1. hirundine608

    Looking like Calendula to me, also. French Marigolds have a different leaf. As too for Chrysanthemums. Whatever they are? Using an overworked superlative, they are gorgeous! Cheers Jamie

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      Thanks to both Hirundine and anglogermantranslations. I hadn’t seen their last comments. I don’t know why. It has been hectic around here with many hours spent at the vet, but now that Frida has gone to her big dome in the sky, I will be sure to scatter some marigolds for her this Day of the Dead. Mums just wouldn’t do! oxoxox to all of you vigilant friends who keep me on the straight and narrow on my blog. I hate disseminating false information and now I am in the know. Not that I won’t be comparing photos the next time I find a flower that is hard to define, as well, and perhaps making a faulty choice in labeling.

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  2. Anna sime

    I am voting for marigolds. Not because they are behind 2 to 1 but because they are truly marigolds of the larger variety.

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    1. variegatus

      Don’t mean to be pedantic, but someone already gave the correct answer: Calendula officinalis, the scientific name for the plant. The confusion comes with common names. In this case, Calendulas are called marigolds in Europe where they are native. In the US, Calendulas are usually called pot marigolds. The name ‘officinalis’ means that the plant has medicinal properties and it was used as such historically in Europe. Both flowers and leaves are edible and the flowers are also used as dye.

      What we call marigolds in the US are typically Tagetes species, native to Mexico, the US southwest and central America. When someone in the US says marigold they usually mean Tagetes, not Calendula, but this won’t mean much to people who don’t live in the US! Common names are so subjective that you can call a plant anything you want and it would be correct. No one can prove otherwise. Marigold and pot marigold are popular common names for this plant. Mums not so much, but there’s no need to spin your wheels about it because common names are never wrong.

      It’s Tagetes that Mexican people use for decorations around Dia de los Muertos, but they’re also used for decorations all around the world now. You can see why scientists and gardening nuts always use the off-putting scientific names. No matter where you live or what language you speak there is never confusion about what the plant is because scientific names are universal.

      But beyond all that it’s a really lovely picture!

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      1. lifelessons Post author

        This is what I love about blogs. Eventually someone who knows the answer comes along and I do so appreciate the work you put into this definitive comment! I’ll change the title as I have utter confidence that you have answered the mystery once and for all. Please never hesitate to correct any other misinformation on my blog. Pedantic is fine when it comes to correcting errors.

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      2. lifelessons Post author

        Variegatus, I can’t find a link to your blog, or I would add it above, and still will. Thanks again for all the time and effort you put in to straighten us out.

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  3. variegatus

    I don’t actually have a blog now, but it’s my pleasure to help a bit. As a gardening nut I’ve been using scientific names for many years. And these days google makes plant ID easier than ever. Today a google search led me to some beautiful pics on your blog, of wildflowers near Tapalpa. Hasta luego.

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