Feral Nature

Feral Nature

This being human is hard
when your blood
draws you to midnight,
throat stretched in a love song
torn from a wild soul.

Your wiry pelt,
raised by the moon’s gravitational pull,
sheds humanity’s cloak,
springs out from hiding,
and reveals its ruff.

The wildest creature for miles,
you lope for the forest,
then bound to the highest hill
to proclaim this night’s dominion
over a too-tame world.

For dVerse Poets. Image by JP Valery on unsplash, used with permission.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized on by .

About lifelessons

My blog, which started out to be about overcoming grief, quickly grew into a blog about celebrating life. I post daily: poems, photographs, essays or stories. I've lived in countries all around the globe but have finally come to rest in Mexico, where I've lived since 2001. My books may be found on Amazon in Kindle and print format, my art in local Ajijic galleries. Hope to see you at my blog.

27 thoughts on “Feral Nature

  1. SAM VOELKER

    Right down my alley~! I have a recurring problem when a coon finally figures out that my Koi pond makes for a good eating place. When this happens they must go for a ride to the park along the river. Tami gets exited when I get out my “friendly live trap”. So last night after setting it, neither Tami nor Eppie (the cat) came in at the usual time. I went out to check on them and they were both standing there, watching that trap~! I guess they were waiting for the coon to arrive~!

    You might enjoy this post I wrote a while back and just found it this morning in my notes… Not great, but I had fun putting it together. (you know me, I like a “play on words”.
    https://mcouvillion.wordpress.com/2021/03/17/fold-the-tent/

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      I had a pet raccoon from the time it was a tiny baby. It’s mother had been killed by hunters, so it was an animal rescue. Later, when it was HUGE–a few years old–we gradually returned it to nature. Then we had a family of raccoons that terrorized out house in the redwoods. I’ve told a few stories about their invasions of our house. Unbelievably canny creatures with great reasoning powers and memory.

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  2. sanaarizvi

    My goodness this is absolutely stunning! I love; “Your wiry pelt, raised by the moon’s gravitational pull, sheds humanity’s cloak, springs out from hiding, and reveals its ruff.”💝💝

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  3. Eilene Lyon

    Sounds like a werewolf tale! Reminds of all the horror classics I loved as a kid. I think some of us do carry a bit of feral nature in us. Just put me in a wilderness and see if I howl.

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      1. Eilene Lyon

        Oh, that is really good and creepy, yet romantic. I had a crush on a boy in 6th grade and turned him into a werewolf in a couple little stories. He didn’t appreciate them! I actually found recently that I still have them – and you can tell he had crumpled them into wads.😆

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  4. kim881

    I love where you’ve gone with this poem, Judy! I’ve often wondered how a werewolf feels about its human side, whether it prefers to be a wolf or a human, whether it embraces its feral nature or rejects it. The pull of the moon is strong and the image of the ‘throat stretched in a love song / torn from a wild soul’ proclaiming the nights’ ‘dominion over a too-tame world’ is powerful.

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  5. robtkistner

    Wow, this is a powerful perspective Judy. Our humaness is as wild as any animal, and perhaps more cunning and dangerous, owing to our strange aberration — the ability to think abstractly.

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  6. Beatriz F.

    So cool–a were poem!! The image is perfect, too! I like the The Moon Is Full and Waiting too (especially the final lines) but this one’s tone and shorter lines seem more appropriate to its subject–raw and feral!

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