Robert Reich’s Real Facts on Trump’s Myth That Immigrants Don’t Pay Taxes.

5 thoughts on “Robert Reich’s Real Facts on Trump’s Myth That Immigrants Don’t Pay Taxes.

  1. cwaugh212

    A sad twisting of the facts with no evidence to back it up. Robert should stop mixing facts about legal immigration and illegal immigration. Of course the USA was built upon the strengths of immigrants, and we let in over 1,000,000 immigrants legally every year. That is more than any other country in the world. We are not immigrant unfriendly. We are just fed up with people entering our country illegally and then supporting them with our tax dollars for welfare, housing assistance, food stamps, free health care, etc. etc. etc. This video does a major disservice to the truth.

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    1. lifelessons Post author

      Hello Charles. I am copying below part of Robert Reich’s biolgraphy as quoted from Wikipedia. I would say that his credentials and honors make him very qualified to comment on the issues he addresses. He backs up his statements with figures. I would be interested in seeing your figures for refuting what he says. –Judy

      Robert Bernard Reich (/raɪʃ/;[2] born June 24, 1946) is an American political commentator, professor, and author. He served in the administrations of Presidents Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Bill Clinton. He was Secretary of Labor from 1993 to 1997. He was a member of President-elect Barack Obama’s economic transition advisory board.

      Reich has been the Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley since January 2006.[3] He was formerly a professor at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government[4] and professor of social and economic policy at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management of Brandeis University. He has also been a contributing editor of The New Republic, The American Prospect (also chairman and founding editor), Harvard Business Review, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.
      Reich is a political commentator on programs including Erin Burnett OutFront, CNN Tonight, Anderson Cooper’s AC360, Hardball with Chris Matthews, This Week with George Stephanopoulos, CNBC’s Kudlow & Company, and APM’s Marketplace. In 2008, TIME MAGAZINE NAMED HIM ONE OF THE TEN BEST CABINET MEMBERS OF THE CENTURY,[5] and The Wall Street Journal in 2008 placed him sixth on its list of the “Most Influential Business Thinkers”.[6] He was appointed a member of President-elect Barack Obama’s economic transition advisory board.[7] Until 2012, he was married to British-born lawyer Clare Dalton, with whom he has two sons, Sam and Adam.[8][9]

      He has published 18 books, including the best-sellers The Work of Nations, Reason, Saving Capitalism, Supercapitalism, Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future, and a best-selling e-book, Beyond Outrage. He is also chairman of Common Cause and writes his own blog about the political economy at Robertreich.org.[10] The Robert Reich–Jacob Kornbluth film “Saving Capitalism” was selected to be a Netflix Original, and debuted in November 2017, and their film Inequality for All won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Utah.[11][12]

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    2. lifelessons Post author

      Hello, Charles.

      Below I am quoting Wikipedia’s bio for Robert Reich. I would say that his credentials and honors make him very qualified to comment on the issues he addresses. He backs up his statements with figures, but I would be very interested in seeing your figures for refuting what he says.–Judy

      Robert Bernard Reich (/raɪʃ/;[2] born June 24, 1946) is an American political commentator, professor, and author. He served in the administrations of Presidents Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Bill Clinton. He was Secretary of Labor from 1993 to 1997. He was a member of President-elect Barack Obama’s economic transition advisory board.
      Reich has been the Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley since January 2006.[3] He was formerly a professor at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government[4] and professor of social and economic policy at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management of Brandeis University. He has also been a contributing editor of The New Republic, The American Prospect (also chairman and founding editor), Harvard Business Review, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.
      Reich is a political commentator on programs including Erin Burnett OutFront, CNN Tonight, Anderson Cooper’s AC360, Hardball with Chris Matthews, This Week with George Stephanopoulos, CNBC’s Kudlow & Company, and APM’s Marketplace. In 2008, Time magazine named him one of the Ten Best Cabinet Members of the century,[5] and The Wall Street Journal in 2008 placed him sixth on its list of the “Most Influential Business Thinkers”.[6] He was appointed a member of President-elect Barack Obama’s economic transition advisory board.[7] Until 2012, he was married to British-born lawyer Clare Dalton, with whom he has two sons, Sam and Adam.[8][9]
      He has published 18 books, including the best-sellers The Work of Nations, Reason, Saving Capitalism, Supercapitalism, Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future, and a best-selling e-book, Beyond Outrage. He is also chairman of Common Cause and writes his own blog about the political economy at Robertreich.org.[10] The Robert Reich–Jacob Kornbluth film “Saving Capitalism” was selected to be a Netflix Original, and debuted in November 2017, and their film Inequality for All won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Utah.[11][12]

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      1. cwaugh212

        Here are a few discrepancies:
        New FAIR Study: Illegal Immigration Costs $116 billion Annually

        September 27, 2017

        |

        IRLI Staff

        Brunt of Costs Fall on State and Local Taxpayers

        (Washington, D.C.) – Illegal immigration to the U.S. costs federal, state and local taxpayers a staggering net cost of $116 billion a year – an increase of some $16 billion compared to previous estimates – according to a new study released by the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR). The study is the most comprehensive to date on the cost to federal, state and local taxpayers of the nation’s 12.5 million illegal immigrants and their 4.2 million citizen children.

        Costs Soar

        The report, “The Fiscal Burden of Illegal Immigration on United States Taxpayers,” examines the cost of illegal immigration through a detailed analysis of federal, state and local programs that are available to the nation’s illegal immigrant population, their U.S.-born children, or accessed via fraud. The study tallies the impact on education, medical, justice/enforcement, welfare and other government programs. The report notes that the $116 billion cost of illegal immigration falls on state and local taxpayers disproportionately – by a ratio of roughly 2 to 1 – with state and local expenditures totaling $88.9 billion and Federal expenditures totaling $45.8 billion, with only approximately $19 billion recouped in taxes.

        Taxes Paid Inadequate

        The staggering total costs of illegal immigrants and their children outweigh the taxes paid to federal and state governments by a ratio of roughly 7 to 1, with costs at nearly $135 billion compared to tax revenues at nearly $19 billion.

        All told, the nearly $135 billion paid out by federal and state and local taxpayers to cover the cost of the presence of 12.5 million illegal aliens and their 4.2 million citizen children amounts to approximately $8,075 per illegal alien and citizen child prior to taxes paid, or $6,940 per person after taxes are paid.

        On the federal level, medical ($17.14 billion) is by far the highest cost, with law enforcement coming second ($13.15 billion) and general government services ($8 billion) third.

        At the state and local level, education ($44.4 billion) was by far the largest expense, followed by general public services ($18.5 billion) and medical ($12.1 billion).

        The study also includes cost and tax revenue estimates per state. The top three states based on total cost to state taxpayers for illegal immigrants and their children: California ($23 billion); Texas ($10.9 billion), and New York ($7.5 billion).

        “Clearly, the cost of doing nothing to stop illegal immigration is far too high,” said FAIR executive director Dan Stein. “President Trump has laid out a comprehensive strategy to regain control of illegal immigration and bring down these costs,” said Stein. “Building the wall, enhancing interior enforcement and mandating national E-Verify will go a long way in bringing these ridiculously high costs under control,” he said.

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