Easter Hunts

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Easter Hunts

My toy cannon muffled by an egg stuffed in its snout.
Easter grass and sugar eggs hidden inside and out.
My parents’ Easter soirees were things of grand design.
The pink nests were sister’s and the yellow ones were mine.
One disappeared behind the mirror, one behind father’s chair.
At the end, still one nest to be found, I knew not where.
Suckers, Peeps and sugar eggs, jelly beans and gummies—
sought out and stuffed in Easter baskets, then stuffed in our tummies.
My folks went to such bother, whereas I must say in truth, 
If I’d been asked, I’d rather have just had a Baby Ruth!

 

Prompt words this Easter Sunday are truth, soiree, disappear, cannon and mirror. (You didn’t make it east this time, folks!)

12 thoughts on “Easter Hunts

  1. slmret

    My mother found some great hiding places for small chocolate eggs — in the holes of the telephone dial, and in the centers of calla lilies were some of my favorites! Happy Easter!

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  2. SAM VOELKER

    When we lived up in your native land, we met an old lady in her upper 90’s and she was still doing those Ukrainian Pysanky Easter Eggs. we bought the equipment and she taught us how to do it. It became a great thing to do on those cold snowed in days in the Dakota’s. But one Sunday morning our son Cass got up and decided to fix us breakfast by breaking some of the ones she made. I still have some even after all those years though. It is fun and would be a rewarding hobby for “rest in place” shut in’s, who are not too busy posting, writing poems or playing spider solitaire like me.

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      1. SAM VOELKER

        Though I worked in the badlands of South Dakota, I was living Williston N.D, and Baker Mt, at the time, that is where we were living when my oldest son was born, Bismark, and Plentywood (twice) and that was one too many, and a few more in North Dakota, also several like Idaho Falls, Montana, Wyoming , Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, California, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, and a lot of Texas etc etc etc OMG I can’t remember them all~! you just name it and I have either done projects there or lived there, some on Indian reservations were not towns.. I told you that I was where you taught school too. See I HAVE been around….but there are no little “marions” left running around there….. Name a town and I will tell you what the people are like….I can also give you a good idea what the sub surface geology is like too but there was not much in South Dakota due the the basement being too shallow….. I actually did work on a project for the government in Idaho Falls where they built the atomic sub engine. Too much and too long ago.

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          1. SAM VOELKER

            Oh my God YES, I am sorry, but I did not like Rock Springs~! It was a nothing town with except for only a few very nice people, had a lot of nothing, no trees, lots of bare land full of deep snow and the wind blew all the time. I should not be that way but I always judged a town by the people in it. The airport was up on a mesa and you never knew with a ground blizzard if a plane could land or not.

            Because of there not being any places to live, a “big wig” man by name of Anselmy actually moved a big two story house onto a lot for us. It was big, cold, windy. noisy and expensive. There was plans to build a highway to bypass the main part of town then, and years later I took that bypass, just to show that I was no longer connected. The only nice thing I can say is it was close to much nicer places like Flaming Gorge, in which I spent my time on a geologic survey before it was flooded and my favorite the Grand Tetons. There were not many places I lived where I had this attitude, sorry~!

            This morning, I was thinking about something else that you and I have discussed online, and I was thinking that you may not have not read the attached which may explain my attitude a lot~!

            https://mcouvillion.wordpress.com/2020/03/05/memories/

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