Tag Archives: Blood Moon

Sunset and Moonglow

img_7667jdbphoto 1/20/2019

Sunset and Moonglow

This moon is not derivative of any other moon.
If I called it a blood moon, I chose my words too soon.
It did not glow as brightly as that vivid red that flowed
when his heartbeat lengthened. When his breathing slowed.

It did not flow as scarlet as life lost by human hand.
It did not pool and sink into the all-obscuring sand.
It’s true that nature paints with blood when mortal creatures die,
but it casts a subtler color when painted on the sky.

The earth is not a marble. Night skies aren’t plastered with stars.
There’s no earthly equivalent for Jupiter or Mars.
When we use manmade metaphors to capture universal
beauties like the evening sky, it seems a real reversal.

When we dream of lovers’ eyes, they should shine like stars.
Stars should not merely twinkle like fireflies caught in jars.
Candy floss swells like a cloud, a sunflower’s like the sun.
Not the other way around. And when the day is done,

the sunset simply is itself and no artist can
duplicate its subtlety with pigments coined by man.

The prompt words today are marble, plaster, derivative and dream.

https://ragtagcommunity.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/rdp-monday-marble/
https://fivedotoh.com/2019/01/21/fowc-with-fandango-plaster/
https://onedailyprompt.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/your-daily-word-prompt-derivative-january-21-2019/
https://wordofthedaychallenge.wordpress.com/2019/01/21/dream/

On the Night of the Blood Moon

Click on the first photo to enlarge all.

I just couldn’t stop taking photos of the moon on this night of a full lunar eclipse. These may not be the best shots, but I was out there for two hours and I’m soooo sleepy. Strangely, this poem I posted earlier this year to one of Mark’s prompts popped up with the photos in my media file when I posted them. Don’t know how its link got recorded as a jpeg nor how it got here, but it seems to want to be posted again, so here it is:

Lucid Moon

With half a life lived in the dark,
an owl’s hoot, an answering bark,
the moon across the water scattered,
ragged clouds, wispy and battered––

I float in night and solitude,
the night determining my mood.
I lie in darkness and I brood,
a nightly lucid interlude.

When sunlight comes in fits and starts,
The day brings out my other parts.
They rise in me from dawn to noon,
dispelling powers of the moon.

Thus balanced between dark and light,
each half consumes its daily bite.
I welcome each within its time
Life varied, balanced and sublime.

Matt’s prompt today was “Lucidity.”  The common meaning of “Lucid” is “clearly expressed” or “easy to understand,” but another meaning is “bright or luminous.”

Terza Rima for Earth’s Shadow

What shadow bigger than a lunar eclipse? I am lucky enough to have seen the eclipse of two blood moons in Mexico.  Below are photos or links to photos of each, along with a rewrite of a poem I wrote after witnessing the first one.

DSC09336

Lunar Eclipse

Last night I rose to watch the full eclipse––
a blood orange moon, full in the dark night sky,
around it, scattered stars and tall palm tips.

It was as though in this world, only I
watched the last fingernail of glowing moon,
chewed at by shadow, slowly wane and die.

And then the night birds with their lonely croon
gave timbre to this darkened night soon joined
by lonely burro, braying for the moon

Perhaps they mourned for vision now purloined
or simply sang for joy of adding to
the beauty of this dark moon newly coined.

Then once again the moon’s edge came to view.
Earth moved aside in favor of the sun
and for an hour, I watched as moonlight grew.

I sought my bed, the pageant not yet done,
as light increased and shadow slowly waned.
Inevitably, once more light had won.

The ending known, no mystery remained.

This poem is written in terza rima, a form invented by Dante and used in The Divine Comedy. It consists of three-line stanzas, with a “chained” rhyme scheme. The first stanza is ABA, the second is BCB, the third is CDC, and so on. No particular meter is necessary, but English poets have tended to default to iambic pentameter. One common way of ending a terza rima poem is with a single line standing on its own, rhyming with the middle line of the preceding three-line stanza.

See more blood moon photos here: https://judydykstrabrown.com/2015/09/27/eclipse-of-the-blood-moon-over-mexico/

And smaller shadows here: https://judydykstrabrown.com/2015/09/03/reflections-shadows-cees-black-and-white-challenge/

 

If you want to write to this prompt, you can post what you’ve written here:  https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/shadow/

Moving Focal Point: Cee’s Rule of Thirds––Compose Yourself Photo Challenge

Moving Focal Point: Cee’s Rule of Thirds

IMG_8593IMG_8241
Version 2I’m trying to figure out why the rule of thirds doesn’t seem to work in this photo.  I think it is because most of the elements are lined up to the left.  If the bottom elements extended over to the right margin, I think this would work better.  Below is the original., which I prefer.  Which do you prefer?
IMG_8964IMG_7106In this photo, cropped from the larger photo below, I followed Cee ‘s rule which says, “. . . divide your view finder into a gird with nine boxes  . . . .  you should place the subject of your picture on one of the points where the lines intersect.”   I much prefer the version above, where the larger “belly button” it placed over the upper left intersection line  to the busier original version below.

IMG_7106 (1)

http://ceenphotography.com/2015/12/02/cees-compose-yourself-photo-challenge-week-9-rule-of-thirds-introduction/

Lunar Eclipse #1

Since we also had a full Lunar Eclipse in 2014, I’m reblogging a poem I wrote for the first one. The photos are also from that eclipse.  I was able to capture the full eclipse last time, but the cloud cover prevented that this time.  I did capture it for most of its cycle, however, and you can view tonight’s pictures HERE.

                                                                     Lunar Eclipse

Image

Lunar Eclipse

Last night I rose to watch the full eclipse––
a blood orange moon, full in the dark night sky,
around it, scattered stars and tall palm tips.

It was as though in this world, only I
watched the last fingernail of glowing moon,
chewed at by shadow, slowly wane and die.

And then the night birds with their lonely croon
gave timbre to this darkened night soon joined
by lonely burro, braying for the moon

as though they mourned for vision now purloined
or simply sang for joy of adding to
the beauty of this dark moon newly coined.

Then once again the moon’s edge came to view.
Earth moved aside in favor of the sun
and for an hour, I watched as moonlight grew.

Then sought my bed, the pageant not yet done,
as light increased and shadow slowly waned.
Inevitably, once more light had won.

The ending known, no mystery remained.

Image

Our prompt today was to write a poem in terza rima, a form invented by Dante and used in The Divine Comedy. It consists of three-line stanzas, with a “chained” rhyme scheme. The first stanza is ABA, the second is BCB, the third is CDC, and so on. No particular meter is necessary, but English poets have tended to default to iambic pentameter. One common way of ending a terza rima poem is with a single line standing on its own, rhyming with the middle line of the preceding three-line stanza.

Here is a link to the pictures I took of the lunar eclipse on September 27 & 28 of 2015! https://judydykstrabrown.com/2015/09/27/eclipse-of-the-blood-moon-over-mexico/

Eclipse of the Blood Moon Over Mexico

Blood Moon Over Mexico

Version 3

IMG_5609 (1)IMG_5663 IMG_5651

Before I went swimming tonight, I set up my camera and tripod. My first view of the eclipse was in my pool.  Palm Tree Silhouettes in front, the moon which had just come out of the cloud cover had just a sliver of shadow. I came in to dry off and went back out to take these shots. It was strange, because I kept getting an illusion of a pink cloud floating over the moon.  It was granular–a bit like like pink undissolved Jello powder floating in water.  There was definite movement.  Perhaps it was a cloud layer reflecting the red of the moon. I’m curious if anyone else had the same experience  It was when I had the most magnification on my zoom–nearly 120 I think.

At any rate, palm trees water and the moon in eclipse create a sort of magic that may have just prompted a type of hypnotic illusion.  I look forward to hearing of your experiences and seeing your photographs.

You can read the poem I wrote about last year’s Blood Moon Eclipse here:  https://judydykstrabrown.com/2015/09/28/lunar-eclipse-1/

NaPoWriMo Day 15: Lunar Eclipse

Image

Lunar Eclipse

Last night I rose to watch the full eclipse––
a blood orange moon, full in the dark night sky,
around it, scattered stars and tall palm tips.

It was as though in this world, only I
watched the last fingernail of glowing moon,
chewed at by shadow, slowly wane and die.

And then the night birds with their lonely croon
gave timbre to this darkened night soon joined
by lonely burro, braying for the moon

as though they mourned for vision now purloined
or simply sang for joy of adding to
the beauty of this dark moon newly coined.

Then once again the moon’s edge came to view.
Earth moved aside in favor of the sun
and for an hour, I watched as moonlight grew.

Then sought my bed, the pageant not yet done,
as light increased and shadow slowly waned.
Inevitably, once more light had won.

The ending known, no mystery remained.

Image

Our prompt today was to write a poem in terza rima, a form invented by Dante and used in The Divine Comedy. It consists of three-line stanzas, with a “chained” rhyme scheme. The first stanza is ABA, the second is BCB, the third is CDC, and so on. No particular meter is necessary, but English poets have tended to default to iambic pentameter. One common way of ending a terza rima poem is with a single line standing on its own, rhyming with the middle line of the preceding three-line stanza.

See more blood moon photos here: https://judydykstrabrown.com/2015/09/27/eclipse-of-the-blood-moon-over-mexico/